A Day in the Life of a Yeti.....Powder Byrne

By natives_cs, 4 Aug '15 at 16:55

Ever wondered what it is like to work for Powder Byrne as a Children's Club Staff member? Here is A Day in the Life of a Yeti...

I wake up and head downstairs for breakfast, to enjoy a Pain au chocolat and a cup of tea before the start of a busy day. At around 8:00am I meet up with the rest of the yeti team and we head to our respective hotels ready for sign in. As the children start to arrive we help them with their ski boots and helmets and chat with the parents about how the family are enjoying their holiday. As sign in continues I, or somebody else in the team, normally move outside the boot room and start a game to warm the yetis up and get them excited for the day.

Once everybody has their boots, bibs and helmets on we load the yetis into the van and head to the slopes. With my group together, skis on and excitement high we hit the lifts ready for a day of skiing! Nobody wants a tired group of yetis, so throughout the morning I always stop for plenty of biscuit and water- breaks.

Around 12pm we rally to the mountain restaurant for yeti lunch. Often lots of yeti groups eat in the same restaurant so we all muck in and help each other out. I help the children with their lunch, cutting up any sausages or spaghetti, and then I can tuck into my own. I always carry colouring pencils and colouring in sheets in my back pack, so when the food has been cleared away the yetis can sit at the table for a while, letting their food digest and their hands warm up before we head back outside. Sometimes we play cards or word games as well. All fed and rested and having been to the loo, we head back out for an afternoon of skiing.

Around 3.45pm we all ski to the bottom of the lifts and meet up with the rest of the yeti groups, ready to be picked up and transported back to the hotels. Parents meet us in the boot room at 4pm, having enjoyed a great days guiding. Once all yetis have been signed out it is time for team meeting. This is a chance for us to feedback to the ski-guides on how all the yetis have been getting on in their lessons, in order for them to let the parents know in their evening visits. Depending on the length of the meeting we sometimes have an hour free to get changed and relax before yeti supper starts.

6.30/45pm, yeti supper is held in the dining room of each hotel. This varies between a buffet and a children’s menu depending on the hotel. We sit with the children while they have supper, helping them with their food and chatting about the fun we’ve had that day. Parents are free to come and sit with them if they want to, so it can also be a great chance to chat to the adults as well.

A couple of evenings a week we have DVD night. This is straight after supper and usually held in the crèche room. We all grab bean bags and relax on the floor to watch a movie, usually the latest animation. This is a welcomed rest at the end of a busy day! Movie night normally finishes by 8.45pm, leaving plenty of time for a few drinks with the rest of the team. (Unless you want to add to the wine fund by doing a few hours babysitting..!)

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