A Day in the life of a Resort Manager...

By natives_cs, 14 Aug '15 at 11:40

Ever wondered what it is like to work for Powder Byrne as a Resort Manager? Here is a day in the life...



I would wake up, throw open the curtains and once again take in that incredible view! Nothing beats the sight of clear blue skies and freshly fallen powder. It’s a sight I will never forget. After fuelling up for a busy day with some breakfast and a coffee (or 2), it’s time to get the team together, jump into the van and up to the hotel for our morning meeting. This is a chance to make sure everybody knows exactly what they’re doing for the day, as well as giving me the opportunity to relay any information that may have cropped up during the previous evening.

After coordinating morning shuttles and with the team up the mountain taking care of guiding and kids clubs, I head back to HQ for a bacon sarnie and probably coffee number 3. Here I’d update my daily plan with any extra information that had been gathered during morning shuttles. After a bit of downtime I head up hotel reception to check room confirmations for any imminent arrivals. At some point before these arrivals I need to head to the lift station to collect any client lift passes, although I’d probably send a member of the ground team to do this for me. As new guests arrive in resort I will always do my absolute best to greet them personally, check them in and take them to ski hire. It’s always helpful to be there to get people through ski hire as quickly as possible, offer them a glass of bubbly, entertain the children and generally get to know them a bit. Throughout the day there’s always plenty to get on with; perhaps confirm some children’s clubs supper numbers, make a lunch or dinner reservation on behalf of a client, venture down to the shops or ski school, or if I’m lucky, pop my skis on and nip around the mountain to check in on a few guiding or kids clubs groups. Never a boring day.

When the guiding groups and children’s clubs return and everybody is signed out, I gather the team together for our afternoon meeting. Here the children’s club staff run through the events of their day, so that the guides can feedback the information to the parents during evening visits. I make sure everybody has been given in any accident forms and is up to date on any arrivals or departures. I will then run through the guiding plans for the next day with the ski guides, with groups changing and guests wanting to do their own thing, it is really important to make sure everybody is on top of the days plans and aware of who is in their group.

Throughout the evening I might drop in on evening visits, help out with shuttles and concierge or generally attend to any guest’s requests or concerns. Around 21:30 things generally start to wind down a little, giving me a chance to enjoy some food and a beer with the team, or a nice hot shower and an early night ready for the next day!
It’s certainly isn’t the easiest of jobs, although to this date I’ve never experienced something so rewarding.

To apply for the role of Resort Manager with Powder Byrne click here or click here to view more jobs from Powder Byrne.

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